Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

The Saintly Sixteen continues with a Hawaiian king vs. the first Native American saint. Kamehameha takes on David Oakerhater as a man passionate about the medical care of his people faces a man whose Cheyenne name is translated “Making Medicine.” Regardless of the outcome, one thing is certain: one of Neva Rae Fox’s saints will advance to the next round.

In yesterday’s first battle of the Saintly Sixteen, Brendan the Navigator finally lost his way, losing to Thecla 62% to 38%. Thecla becomes the first saint of Lent Madness 2015 to advance to the Elate Eight where she’ll face the winner of Francis of Assisi vs. Cecilia.

After today’s vote is decided, Lent Madness will resume first thing Monday morning as Cuthbert takes on Molly Brant. Stay tuned for more saintly action!

Prince_Alexander_Liholiho_with_leisKamehameha

Kamehameha is renowned for his many ministries – from introducing Anglicanism to the Hawaiian Islands to translating the Book of Common Prayer into the local vernacular. Another of his lasting legacies throughout Hawaii was the pioneering steps he instigated for the betterment of the health and welfare of his people.

Kamehameha IV was born Alexander Iolani Liholiho on February 9, 1834 and was crowned King just shy of his 21st birthday.

With his wife and partner in reform, Queen Emma, Kamehameha set forth to transform the Hawaiian Islands by offering his people new, modern ways of life. He was devoted to introducing modern healthcare methods and facilities. Perhaps his drive was based on the healthcare issues that touched him and his family.

From the time of his birth to his ascension to the throne, Kamehameha witnessed much sadness over the health of his people. There was an effort in 1839 to vaccinate the population, which had been prompted by a smallpox outbreak. In 1848, measles, brought to the islands by foreign ships, killed one-third of the residents. Other epidemics in 1848-1849 — whooping cough, influenza and the ever-threatening smallpox — killed one in ten of the Hawaiian population. In 1853 another smallpox epidemic killed 5,000 to 6,000 more Hawaiians.

In response to these ongoing tragedies, the King designed a plan to build hospitals for the sick and dying, and homes for the elderly. When the government legislature refused to support his plans, he and Queen Emma raised private funds – enough not only for a hospital but for a much-needed leprosy clinic as well. In 1859 The Queen’s Hospital – named for Emma and still in operation as The Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu — opened in temporary quarters.

In laying the cornerstone, Kamehameha said, “There is something wholesome in being called upon from time to time to acknowledge, however strong our own health may be, and however prosperous our fortunes, that after all, the sick are our brothers and sisters.”

On the home front, Kamehameha and Emma had a son, Albert who died in 1863. It is told that Kamehameha felt responsible for the death of Prince Albert. The four-year-old prince was seriously ill, burning with fever, possibly with spinal meningitis. Kamehameha gave the boy a cold shower to cool him off. However, Albert’s health deteriorated, and the youngster died in August 1862.

Heartbroken, grief stricken, and with his own health failing him as he suffered with nerve disorders and asthma, Kamehameha died the next year. Some believe he died of grief. He was only 29 years old.

Kamehameha had a short life, but in his time, he made a lasting impact on the lives of his people and on the generations to come in many ways, from Anglicanism and prayers to healthcare and hospitals.

Neva Rae Fox

200px-Making_medicine.portraitDavid Oakerhater

David Pendleton Oakerhater, an Episcopal deacon and the first Native American saint, was an accomplished artist and a leader in an art style known as Ledger art.

A Cheyenne Indian of Oklahoma, Oakerhater was imprisoned by the United States Army in Florida beginning in 1875. During this imprisonment, an education was provided for all the Native American prisoners that included language, Christianity and art.

Furnished with some instructions and art supplies like pencils, ink, paints, crayons, and paper, Oakerhater delved into art as his new form of expression. Using pens, he and the other prisoners drew in ledger books, hence the name of the art form.

Ledger art is defined as a Native American drawing or painting on paper or cloth. Historians report that Ledger art was popular from the Civil War through World War I. The term Ledger art is rooted from the accounting ledger books that were used for paper. Ledger art has been described as an abstract style illustrating the everyday life of Native Americans, such as dances, hunts, tribal events and self-portraits.

The artwork that emerged from the Florida prison differed from the traditional Plains Indian art in that the prisoners began to focus less upon themselves and their actions, and more upon things.

Oakerhater excelled at this art form and, even now, he is deemed as one of the foundations of modern Native American artists, particularly for the Ledger art. He and the other Native American prisoners helped Ledger art to evolve to become a distinctly Native American art form.

Oakerhater signed some of his works with the English translation of his Cheyenne name, which was “Making Medicine.” Sometimes he signed with a glyph depicting a dancer in a sun dance.

It was through his art that Oakerhater’s patron, Mrs. Alice Key Pendleton first noticed him. This connection eventually assisted in Oakerhater’s release from the Florida prison. After his release, Oakerhater devoted his time to his diaconal duties, his Church responsibilities, and his ministry to his fellow Native Americans.

There are no reports of Oakerhater, or Making Medicine, continuing his art work after his departure from prison. Perhaps it was because he had a new passion. When he returned to his people in 1881 he preached in a sermon, “You remember when I led you out to war I went first, and what I told you was true. Now I have been away to the East and I have learned about another captain, the Lord Jesus Christ, and he is my leader. He goes first, and all He tells me is true. I come back to my people to tell you to go with me now in this new road, a war that makes all for peace.”

Neva Rae Fox

Vote!

Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

  • Kamehameha (61%, 3,607 Votes)
  • David Oakerhater (39%, 2,283 Votes)

Total Voters: 5,890

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142 Comments to "Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater"

  1. Barbara from St. Barnabas's Gravatar Barbara from St. Barnabas
    March 13, 2015 - 8:19 am | Permalink

    My vote is for Kamechamcha. I found his work to improve the health of his people inspiring. I love that he raised the money himself for hospitals, etc. when the government would not provide it. This quote sums up his noble intentions…..”There is something wholesome in being called upon from time to time to acknowledge, however strong our own health may be, and however prosperous our fortunes, that after all, the sick are our brothers and sisters.”

    • MegN's Gravatar MegN
      March 13, 2015 - 8:57 am | Permalink

      I voted for Kamehameha for the sole reason of his quote, which is needed today in support of current U.S. healthcare more than ever!

      ”There is something wholesome in being called upon from time to time to acknowledge, however strong our own health may be, and however prosperous our fortunes, that after all, the sick are our brothers and sisters.”

      We NEED WHOLESOMENESS today and every day going forward in the world!!

      • Vonelle Kostelny-Vogts's Gravatar Vonelle Kostelny-Vogts
        March 13, 2015 - 2:53 pm | Permalink

        Amen!

      • Frank Jacob's Gravatar Frank Jacob
        March 13, 2015 - 11:31 pm | Permalink

        AMEN, MegN!

  2. Jen E. Ochsner's Gravatar Jen E. Ochsner
    March 13, 2015 - 8:21 am | Permalink

    A difficult choice again this morning………with a flip of the proverbial coin, it’s David Oakerhater.

  3. Patricia's Gravatar Patricia
    March 13, 2015 - 8:21 am | Permalink

    BEFORE you cast your vote, please read the previous bio of David Pendleton Oakerhater at http://www.lentmadness.org/2015/02/teresa-of-avila-vs-david-oakerhater-2/#more-4437
    Otherwise one is lead to believe Oakerhater’s main merit is his artwork. Both brought the Christian faith to their people; one service his people by building hospitals; the other through schools.
    “Oakerhater’s ministry blossomed in Oklahoma with the launching of schools and the founding of missions; this was often without the support of the Church and with resistance by the U.S. government. He was tireless in his ministry”
    HEALTH vs EDUCATION? Both missions are worthy.
    Let’s also be consistent
    “He [ Oakerhater,] was tireless in his ministry, never stopping until his death on August 31, 1931. He also continued in his art and is considered one of the founders of modern Native American art.”

    • helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
      March 13, 2015 - 9:15 am | Permalink

      Both of the saints today would be called “First People,” and both of them are fantastic individuals. Kamehameha IV and Emma also worked for the education of their people, in setting up schools. They established the Priory School for Girls, next to the Cathedral in Honolulu, for the education of girls had been neglected. This prestigious school is still educating girls to become strong, independent contributors to the world. Many of the students receive assistance to participate in these invaluable opportunities.

      • Wynne Osborne's Gravatar Wynne Osborne
        March 13, 2015 - 11:29 am | Permalink

        I totally agree that both are fantastic “real” people. It seems easier for Lent Madness voters to accept those who are closer to us in time and whose deeds are well documented.

    • KLF's Gravatar KLF
      March 13, 2015 - 10:38 am | Permalink

      Yes, I absolutely agreed. I voted for David Oakerhater in the first round, and after reading the offerings today I wondered why. When I went back and re-read the original biographies, I had the exact same reaction. I value art, but that wasn’t all there was to Oakerhater’s ministry and mission.

    • March 13, 2015 - 11:13 am | Permalink

      Thanks for pointing that out, Patricia – the most important contributions of Oakerhater were left out of this information – giving the Hawaiian king a decidedly biased push toward saintdom.

      • Geoff McL's Gravatar Geoff McL
        March 13, 2015 - 4:55 pm | Permalink

        The primary bios are never rehashed in subsequent rounds. Actually, I was surprised at how wordy the statements today were. Wait till we get toward the end and things start getting _really_ whimsical!

    • Anthony Lee's Gravatar Anthony Lee
      March 13, 2015 - 1:08 pm | Permalink

      I’m another one who is thankful for the link back to Oakerhater’s earlier, more informative biography, but even so, in a more than usually difficult choice between two native Americans who worked for their people, I’m siding with Kamehamea because of his work with hospitals and healthcare.

      • Gwin Hanahan's Gravatar Gwin Hanahan
        March 13, 2015 - 2:05 pm | Permalink

        Well said, Anthony Lee.
        Mahalo

      • ej's Gravatar ej
        March 13, 2015 - 4:47 pm | Permalink

        Interesting comparison. Though in terms of power, Kamehamea had some, he was the King. David Oakerhater did all of is work without the power and support of the government or the power and support of the church. He is an example of what one Christian can do in the world. My vote is for Oakerhater.

        • kathie zingler's Gravatar kathie zingler
          March 13, 2015 - 7:06 pm | Permalink

          Actually, the king had very little power then. The white settlers, descendents of white missionaries, had the power. This is evident in the bio which states that the king’s project was not approved He had to raise his own monies for the project. Sounds to me like he had the title only.

    • March 13, 2015 - 1:11 pm | Permalink

      of course today’s stories seem incomplete. The whole deal with Lent Madness is that each round contains NEW information that builds on the old, and often every round’s info becomes more and more obscure (or maybe what some of us would call “less important”?). It’s why the Celebrity Bloggers have such a hard job–trying to lobby for their saint while still holding some stuff for later rounds. It’s OUR job as readers/voters to refresh our memories with their previous work, not the CB’s job to re-write it all in every round. And Neva Rae Fox has a double hard job–to lobby for two saints in the same matchup, without repeating all the info she wrote before! Very impressive.

      If you think this round doesn’t have enough “important contributions” info, wait for the Saintly Kitsch round…

    • Kim's Gravatar Kim
      March 13, 2015 - 1:45 pm | Permalink

      I agree that the writeup on Oakerhater was particularly weak today. It made it sound like he hadn’t really done anything that would compare with Kamehameha when in reality these 2 are very closely related in service to their people. Yet Oakerhater overcame more difficult opposition to accomplish his mission. Perhaps this is the first case of a fixing an outcome by a celebrity blogger? Oh the scandal!!!!!!

      • Robert's Gravatar Robert
        March 13, 2015 - 2:09 pm | Permalink

        Kim, I think you may have a point about scandal! On the other hand, voters should have long enough memory to remember something they read just one round ago. On a third hand, this is America. Scandals are part of our culture!

      • ej's Gravatar ej
        March 13, 2015 - 4:52 pm | Permalink

        I think it is a scandal in how the church, who is to be a model of equality responded to both Kamehameha who had power and Oakerhater who did not have power and did the ministry he was called to do without support of the Church. As we lift up Oakerhater, we are faced with the neglect by the Church for his ministry with native peoples–doing so is somewhat uncomfortable for us; it is much easier for us to celebrate Kamehameha.

  4. March 13, 2015 - 8:23 am | Permalink

    Gotta love someone who knows that everyone needs healthcare!

  5. March 13, 2015 - 8:32 am | Permalink

    Both were extraordinary saints. But I am swayed by the way Oakerhater opposed injustice and accomplished his missionary work despite official lack of either church or government support.

    • Denise's Gravatar Denise
      March 13, 2015 - 8:41 am | Permalink

      I agree that this is a tough matchup, both have extraordinary accomplishments and did so much for their people. I had to ultimately go with Oakerhater though.

  6. Oliver-Seven Years old's Gravatar Oliver-Seven Years old
    March 13, 2015 - 8:34 am | Permalink

    I voted Making Medicine. He was an Indian and he rides a horse and found Jesus and told everybody and he looks cool.

    • Katherine Schroeder's Gravatar Katherine Schroeder
      March 13, 2015 - 8:44 am | Permalink

      Same here, Oliver. Keep reading and voting!

      • Oliver's Gravatar Oliver
        March 13, 2015 - 9:40 pm | Permalink

        (Oliver’s Mom) thanks for the encouragement. It means so much.

      • Oliver's Gravatar Oliver
        March 13, 2015 - 9:41 pm | Permalink

        (oliver’s mom) that’s for the encouragement. it means to world to us.

    • Sonia's Gravatar Sonia
      March 13, 2015 - 4:20 pm | Permalink

      Oliver, you’re an inspiration! Keep it up.

  7. Diane Wick's Gravatar Diane Wick
    March 13, 2015 - 8:41 am | Permalink

    As an artist married to a physician I have emotional pulls in both directions. This one is very difficult for me, and a thank you to Patricia for adding more background. That said, I reluctantly made a choice (can’t vote for both?). It is Kamehameha for me.

  8. jack zamboni's Gravatar jack zamboni
    March 13, 2015 - 8:46 am | Permalink

    I’m with Patricia, above. These bios alone can leave the impression that one saint was concerned with health care, the other primarily with the arts. I love knowing more about Deacon David’s art, but that’s not why he’s on the Calendar of Saints. Even taking into account the fullness of his ministry, it’s a tough call: two saints of indigenous American peoples (if one counts Hawaii as American) who, inspired by Christ, sought to improve the lives of their communities in significant ways. Because I have some family connections with other midwestern Native American Episcopalians, my vote goes to Oakerhater.

  9. helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
    March 13, 2015 - 8:49 am | Permalink

    Please do not forget that Kamehameha IV invited the Episcopal Church to the Hawaiian Islands, but insisted that the people retain their culture and customs. The Episcopal Church agreed. Many other missionaries had infiltrated the islands, and demanded that the Hawaiians convert to all of their ways, and turn their backs on the Hawaiian way of life. The Episcopal Church was accepting of all, even back then. My daughter, Aggy, sings in the cathedral choir, and reads the lessons in Hawaiian at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Honolulu, and teaches at the Priory Girl’s School, next to St. Andrew’s. Aggy teaches the Hawaiian language and Hawaiian culture and history. This cathedral and girls’s school was established by King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma. Emma was vigilant in establishing education for girls to become strong, independent leaders in Hawai’i. The education of girls had been neglected for quite a while. Many of the girls attending the prestigious private school both then and now are on scholarships, to offer opportunities and advancement to all, just as the King and Queen had wanted. I’m going with King Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma all the way. Here you get two Saints for the price of one! The stained glass window of Saints Kamehameha and Emma is exquisite. When Agg was married in St Andrew’s, we placed special Hawaiian flowers, which had been collected on the nearby hills, beneath their window; very spiritual and holy spot in the church. Mahalo, h+

    • Francis of Granby's Gravatar Francis of Granby
      March 13, 2015 - 9:21 am | Permalink

      Love this. Thank you for sharing it.

    • Mary W.'s Gravatar Mary W.
      March 13, 2015 - 9:29 am | Permalink

      Yep, Oakerhater is a worthy opponent, but I’m going with Big Pineapple today!

    • Lucy Porter's Gravatar Lucy Porter
      March 13, 2015 - 9:55 am | Permalink

      Thank you, Helene, for helping me decide. It’s hard for a retired hospital chaplain to vote for anyone who wasn’t involved in health care, but that isn’t the issue here–after all St. David’s Indian name translates as “Making Medicine”. But I have to go with K. and Emma this time–partly because of the healthcare, partly because of the translation of the BCP into the Hawaiian language, partly because the institutions they founded are still functioning brilliantly, partly because of the emphasis on the education of women…

    • Ann's Gravatar Ann
      March 13, 2015 - 11:30 am | Permalink

      Yes, remembering that a vote for Kamehameha IV is a vote for Emma, he gets my vote. Emma was the true power behind the throne, but the king was wise enough to listen! I like the thought 0f Kamehameha & Emma embracing the holiness of wholeness–in body (establishing the hospital), mind (the school) and spirit (St Andrew’s Cathedral). And isn’t it wonderful that all three institutions are still thriving today.

      • annette's Gravatar annette
        March 13, 2015 - 2:13 pm | Permalink

        Well said, Ann. Thank you.
        Maybe also an example of the holiness of wholeness in their marriage — united in their commitment and diligence, as well as in their faith.

    • Sandra Mueller's Gravatar Sandra Mueller
      March 13, 2015 - 11:59 am | Permalink

      Dear Helene,
      Loved your letter and the story of your daughter, Aggy. I went to the Priory in 1946 and the daily morning prayer service was (is) the foundation of my religious practice. We wore little white head covers and marched over to the Cathedral every morning before class began. Wish I’d had the chance to learn the Hawaiian language; I only know a few words and of course I speak a leedle da kine talk ; you know, now and then. I attended Robert Louis Stevenson Standard English School.
      Kamehameha and Emma did so much that is impressive and lasting for their people and the Islands. Fond aloha, Sandie

      • helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
        March 13, 2015 - 11:16 pm | Permalink

        Dear Sandie,
        What an inspiring story of how Kamehameha touched your life and continues to touch those of so many others. Mahalo, h+

    • sue's Gravatar sue
      March 14, 2015 - 8:29 am | Permalink

      Back in the 70’s I had the honor of working for Mollie Tong in Grand Rapids, Mi. She was from Hawaii. I’m pretty sure from what I can remember of what she told me of her early life that she had gone to one of the school’s established by Queen Emma. And so I thank Queen Emma for giving Mollie the education that eventually brought our lives together and provided me with a great boss, mentor and friend. When Queen Emma ran in Lent Madness I was in awe of all she did and voted for her to win the Golden Halo. Mollie and I lost touch after we both moved out of Michigan and eventually I learned that she had died. I became an Episcopalian after leaving Michigan. I so so wish I knowing what I know now of the King and Queen thanks to Lent Madness that I could talk to Mollie to learn more of all of their histories for her perspective.

  10. John Lewis's Gravatar John Lewis
    March 13, 2015 - 8:50 am | Permalink

    Both saints bucked institutions, both taught with authority, both advanced civilization, both incarnated the best in Anglican tradition. In the end I went with Kamehameha after a session of LECTIO DIVINA: “after all,the sick are our brothers and sisters” was the phrase that spoke to me throughout my discernment process.

  11. Millie Ericson's Gravatar Millie Ericson
    March 13, 2015 - 8:51 am | Permalink

    Go to this link for an excellent and more complete biography of David. He was amazing! Go David! Go David!

    http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Oakerhater/bio.html

  12. Millie Ericson's Gravatar Millie Ericson
    March 13, 2015 - 8:54 am | Permalink

    Go to this link and read this wonderful and thorough biography of David! Go David! Go David!

    http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Oakerhater/bio.html

  13. Carla's Gravatar Carla
    March 13, 2015 - 8:54 am | Permalink

    Really tough choice. Had voted for both these men in their original rounds. Wanted to vote for both again. Alas, no can do. Finally went with Oakerhater.

  14. Karen's Gravatar Karen
    March 13, 2015 - 8:56 am | Permalink

    Also for Kamehameha. Compassionate, practical action despite privileged position. His wife’s partnership reinforced his capacity for loving relationships grounded in belief. Not an easy decision

  15. March 13, 2015 - 8:56 am | Permalink

    What a tough choice! I voted for Kamehameha because I think of his hospital as fulfilling Jesus’ command to heal the sick.

  16. Patrice's Gravatar Patrice
    March 13, 2015 - 8:58 am | Permalink

    Heavenly Father,
    It saddens our hearts to learn about the sins of our fathers and the suffering of native people from European contact. Thank you for the inspiring examples of these men who, instead of spending their days seeking recompense, devoted their lives to the healing of bodies and souls through medical care, art, education, and sharing the good news of salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

    • Carolina's Gravatar Carolina
      March 13, 2015 - 9:42 am | Permalink

      Amen.

  17. Diann's Gravatar Diann
    March 13, 2015 - 8:58 am | Permalink

    A saint who gets a submarine named after him gets my vote. Kamehameha it is!

    • pHil's Gravatar pHil
      March 13, 2015 - 10:05 am | Permalink

      At least it’s the more singable of the two names, but is that enough for me to base a choice on? It certainly didn’t help win converts yesterday to Brendan over Thecla.

  18. Margaret's Gravatar Margaret
    March 13, 2015 - 9:06 am | Permalink

    Again, a tough one. I was ready to vote for David. (After all, I am a deacon.) They both did amazing things for their people; but Kamehameha managed to find a way around a recalcitrant legislature to bring health care to the population, his “brothers and sisters”.
    Should we but have a Kamehameha around now! He has my vote.

  19. Dan's Gravatar Dan
    March 13, 2015 - 9:09 am | Permalink

    What a difficult choice. I am going with Making Medicine because I live in a state with a large native American population, many of whom are Episcopalian. Their history is fraught with suffering, and yet they maintain a wonderful spirituality, and I know some of the artists personally.

  20. Linda's Gravatar Linda
    March 13, 2015 - 9:11 am | Permalink

    I voted for Oakerhater before but now that he has come up against Kamehameha
    I had to vote for the later. Both did much for their peoples.

  21. Tom and George McFarland's Gravatar Tom and George McFarland
    March 13, 2015 - 9:13 am | Permalink

    I would have been inclined to vote for Queen Emma, but chose David Oakerhater over King Kamehameha. The Florida connection got to me and the change from warrior to artist, deacon and peacemaker.

  22. March 13, 2015 - 9:18 am | Permalink

    I went with Oakerhater, a healer, an artist, a war leader who turned away from war (we need more of these right now)…but really, who can choose between the two?

  23. Donna Devlin's Gravatar Donna Devlin
    March 13, 2015 - 9:19 am | Permalink

    Being on the losing side is not always bad. Wining is definitely not the only thing. Great King. Go David!

  24. Patsy's Gravatar Patsy
    March 13, 2015 - 9:20 am | Permalink

    Oh, today’s choice is for the first time between two that I voted for in the first round. This is hard.

    • Kathy Hartley's Gravatar Kathy Hartley
      March 13, 2015 - 9:51 am | Permalink

      I am in the same spot. Ended up going with Kamehmeha because of the health care and his cultural sensitivity, but only by a hair. TOUGH!!!!!

  25. Pat's Gravatar Pat
    March 13, 2015 - 9:22 am | Permalink

    Wow! What a choice – between two equally accomplished saints – They are saints for a reason; they both endured much (although one more privileged) and moved beyond that to assist their people! My vote is not for the best or who did the most because they truly seem to be matched- my vote is for Kamehameha, as we in the US are in a health care crisis and could use the practical good sense and ideas for funding that he represents.

  26. March 13, 2015 - 9:22 am | Permalink

    This was really a very tough choice this morning. It will be very interesting to see the outcome from this pairing.

  27. Karen's Gravatar Karen
    March 13, 2015 - 9:23 am | Permalink

    Our Deacon has been lobbying hard for two weeks. David Oakerhaeter it is!

  28. Thomas's Gravatar Thomas
    March 13, 2015 - 9:25 am | Permalink

    This last sentence lost my vote for David “a war that makes all for peace.” We don’t need war for peace! Granted, Kamehameha’s son died in both 1862 and 1863 – typo?

    • pHil's Gravatar pHil
      March 13, 2015 - 10:16 am | Permalink

      If he died and then had to come back to die again I hope at least he took advantage of Dionysius’ two baptisms.

    • Harlie Youngblood's Gravatar Harlie Youngblood
      March 13, 2015 - 5:46 pm | Permalink

      Thomas,
      When David referred to “a war that makes all for peace” he wasn’t speaking of violent, military war. He meant being a Soldier for Christ, spreading the Gospel, doing good to all people, and loving God. In fact, it was that same last sentence that won my vote for David.

  29. Susan Maurine's Gravatar Susan Maurine
    March 13, 2015 - 9:26 am | Permalink

    The artist and dancer in me wants to vote again for Making Medicine–what an incredible man! But I’ve just recently returned from Hawaii, and when my daughter was injured during our stay, we were grateful for the kindness and assistance we received from the local clinic and hospital there.
    Another wonderful thing about the Hawaiians is that they have been able to retain a good bit of their culture despite the intrusion of us haole.
    And there were three Episcopal churches on the island we visited! Kamehameha for me!

  30. March 13, 2015 - 9:27 am | Permalink

    Hard, hard choice in a very difficult match up but the king’s love of and concern for his people tipped the scales.

  31. Susan Maurine's Gravatar Susan Maurine
    March 13, 2015 - 9:28 am | Permalink

    And kudos to Neva Rae Fox!

    • linda m.'s Gravatar linda m.
      March 13, 2015 - 11:06 am | Permalink

      LIKE

  32. March 13, 2015 - 9:35 am | Permalink

    “another Captain, the Lord Jesus Christ” — just a clarity on who we follow and our led by… that leads to all the rest… caring, compassion, social action, justice, forgiveness. Thank you David for such clear focus of our faith.

  33. Gary47290's Gravatar Gary47290
    March 13, 2015 - 9:37 am | Permalink

    I live in California, my perspective is Pacific-ward. I vote for Kamehameha, but this was a tough call: which saint from a people nearly exterminated by European-American hubris should advance?

    • Amanda's Gravatar Amanda
      March 13, 2015 - 5:53 pm | Permalink

      Agreed, Gary47290 – also from California & also well aware of the element of European-American hubris at play here. IMO, though the Anglican Church’s antics were not the same as those of the Catholic Church, I find it hard to overlook the decimation of indigenous people & voting either way in this instance feels a bit like sanctioning destructive forces. That said, I voted Oakerhater because he accomplished what he did without the weight of the throne of at his back.

  34. Millie Ericson's Gravatar Millie Ericson
    March 13, 2015 - 9:42 am | Permalink

    David Oakerhater has been hidden and unknown to most of the world. Often, even that written about him is in error. His greatness among his people as a warrior for peace, a true deacon who served tirelessly without recognition; and whose Art continues to inspire Native American artists makes him worthy of going all the way to the Golden Halo. He has earned in his dedication to God, his people and his church the recognition so long denied him.

    On the other hand, Kamehameha is honored throughout Hawaii with statutes, buildings named after him, holy sites, a huge state holiday in his honor. Many have heard of him. He does not need the additional recognition.

    Deacon Oakerhater has only a small but beautiful chapel at the Cathedral in Oklahoma City dedicated to him: http://www.stpaulscathedralokc.org/oakerhater-chapel.

    Let’s raise Deacon David Oakerhater up through the Bracket!! VOTE MAKING MEDICINE!!

  35. Joe Stroud's Gravatar Joe Stroud
    March 13, 2015 - 9:43 am | Permalink

    A government official who truly cares for his people and a “nobody”/prisoner who persevered and succeeded in spite of his not having wealth and privilege. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, . . . . difficult choice indeed. But, finally, David Oakerhater, if for no other reason than he shows us that prisoners are people, too, a fact often forgotten in the human warehouse business we call our “penal system.”

  36. March 13, 2015 - 9:44 am | Permalink

    This was very difficult! But I must support Kamehameha…(and the vaccination of our children)!

  37. Harry Alford's Gravatar Harry Alford
    March 13, 2015 - 9:44 am | Permalink

    What a matchup! In overtime, Oakerhater with the buzzer beater.

  38. Alan Justice's Gravatar Alan Justice
    March 13, 2015 - 9:45 am | Permalink

    Making Medicine’s image of Jesus as captain swung my vote for the Cheyenne saint.

  39. Ann E's Gravatar Ann E
    March 13, 2015 - 9:47 am | Permalink

    Both saints are amazing in their identifying and improving situations that cried for attention but were ignored. I went with Kamehameha because he accomplished so much is his short lifetime, which was obviously filled with personal tragedy. Hospitals care for his people, translating the Book of Common Prayer, taking the initiative to raise funds himself when his government refused to help…Kamehameha for me!

  40. Alec Clement's Gravatar Alec Clement
    March 13, 2015 - 9:52 am | Permalink

    Moved by Kamehameha’s compassion..most Christlike.

  41. Anne E.B.'s Gravatar Anne E.B.
    March 13, 2015 - 9:52 am | Permalink

    Today’s a toughie. I voted for King K the first go-round. But today I’m an Oakerlover.
    Hee hee! Go Making Medicine!!!!!

  42. Susan Keeter's Gravatar Susan Keeter
    March 13, 2015 - 9:54 am | Permalink

    Ten years ago, I had the honor of meeting Saint O-kuh-ha-tah’s granddaughter (Elizabeth Whiteshield) and several other descendants and joining them in visiting the graves of his wife and child in Utica, NY, and the churches in Utica and Syracuse (Grace) where he was baptized and ordained. Ms. Whiteshield spoke of the profound experience of “walking through the doorways my grandpa once walked through, touching the ground where he once stood,and praying where he once prayed.”

  43. Michael DeVine's Gravatar Michael DeVine
    March 13, 2015 - 9:54 am | Permalink

    Both are great and did great things. I went for David Oakerhater because he did his great things from a position of weakness and persecution and King Kamehameha did his works from a position of power.

  44. March 13, 2015 - 9:57 am | Permalink

    Gotta go with Deacon David and his leading in “the war that makes for peace.”

  45. Phil Kober's Gravatar Phil Kober
    March 13, 2015 - 10:09 am | Permalink

    As a physician I have to vote for Kamehameha who tried to improve health care for his people by building hospitals and bringing aspects of modern medicine like smallpox vaccine to Hawaii!

  46. Ralegh's Gravatar Ralegh
    March 13, 2015 - 10:09 am | Permalink

    I agree with so many, very tough choice, and I voted for both in the first round. I’m finally going for Kamehameha because he accomplished so much in so short a life with grief for his son. But if Oakerhater takes it, I will probably support him in future rounds.

  47. John Kreidler's Gravatar John Kreidler
    March 13, 2015 - 10:11 am | Permalink

    Thank the Lord for saintly couples! Having said that, I find it difficult to tell what are Kamehameha’s saintly creds apart from Emma’s, who had her run at the Golden Halo. Considering both the quirks and quotes and the biographies, Medicine Maker is the individual who stands out for me.

    John Kreidler

  48. March 13, 2015 - 10:15 am | Permalink

    This is a link to a picture of the stained glass window of St. David Pendleton Oakerhater (O-kuh-ha-tuh) in Grace Episcopal Church, Syracuse, NY, the national shrine of the first Native American Episcopal saint. The glass images were created from color pencil sketches drawn by St. Oakerhater’s great-granddaughter. The window is extraordinary for both its connection to his ancestor and for the stunning Cherokee imagery in St. Oakerhater’s native dress and background. I encourage everyone to check it out! St. Oakerhater’s legacy is evident at Grace Church, an urban parish with a beautifully diverse congregation and a passion for social justice. We are honored to walk in the footsteps of this great saint.
    http://gracesyracuse.org/who-we-are/history/

  49. Fiona Haworth's Gravatar Fiona Haworth
    March 13, 2015 - 10:18 am | Permalink

    Really hard choice today. Both are wholly admirable and I am profoundly grateful that they are part of the Anglican Church. After pondering I voted for David Oakerhater because of all he achieved in spite of imprisonment; and because of his words on returning to his people. “You remember when I led you out to war I went first, and what I told you was true. Now I have been away to the East and I have learned about another captain, the Lord Jesus Christ, and he is my leader. He goes first, and all He tells me is true. I come back to my people to tell you to go with me now in this new road, a war that makes all for peace.”

  50. Jennifer B-C Seaver's Gravatar Jennifer B-C Seaver
    March 13, 2015 - 10:24 am | Permalink

    Having lived in Hawaii, and having to pronounce Kamehameha’s name for our peerless church leader, Ed, I proudly vote for the Hawaiian king and Queen Emma.

  51. Ellen B.'s Gravatar Ellen B.
    March 13, 2015 - 10:24 am | Permalink

    What a great matchup: science vs art! I loved learning about both of these men, but gave my vote to Oakerhater because of his passionate witness. I found this great article about smallpox in checking the dates cited in the Kamehameha article:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1200696/
    Evidently Jenner wasn’t the first to use the technique. I wouldn’t have investigated the subject without LM! Thanks!

  52. Noele's Gravatar Noele
    March 13, 2015 - 10:26 am | Permalink

    Believing in Christ was forced upon David while the King with his rank had the choice to incorporate new. While it is amazing that David took up with the new religion and spent the rest of his life at it, my heart lies more with King K who allowed the coexistence of two beautiful backgrounds while leading gently in the Anglican Christian way.

  53. Lu Daniels's Gravatar Lu Daniels
    March 13, 2015 - 10:27 am | Permalink

    Isn’t a Hawaiian king also a native American? Though Hawaii was not a US state at the time, neither was Oklahoma when Oakerhater was alive.

  54. March 13, 2015 - 10:42 am | Permalink

    Sorry, I meant accidentally put Cherokee instead of Cheyenne in my prior posting.

  55. Cheryle's Gravatar Cheryle
    March 13, 2015 - 10:44 am | Permalink

    As others have said, this is a tough choice. I voted for Kamehameha in the first round, and would have voted for Oakerhater, but he was up against Teresa de Avila, whom I have long loved. Both men were certainly ground-breakers for their people and I appreciate that each of them honored their native culture when introducing Christianity. Both healers, both educators. Should I toss a coin? Draw straws? I have once again gone with Kamehama for the simple reason that I have a precious friend in my parish church who is Hawaiian and who loves her native land!

  56. Sarah Reks's Gravatar Sarah Reks
    March 13, 2015 - 10:52 am | Permalink

    This is a link to a picture of the stained glass window of St. David Pendleton Oakerhater (O-kuh-ha-tuh) in Grace Episcopal Church, Syracuse, NY, the national shrine of the first Native American Episcopal saint. The glass images were created from color pencil sketches drawn by St. Oakerhater’s great-granddaughter. The window is extraordinary for both its connection to his ancestor and for the stunning Cheyenne imagery in St. Oakerhater’s native dress and background. I encourage everyone to check it out! St. Oakerhater’s legacy is evident at Grace Church, an urban parish with a beautifully diverse congregation and a passion for social justice. We are honored to walk in the footsteps of this great saint.

  57. Carla's Gravatar Carla
    March 13, 2015 - 10:59 am | Permalink

    Kamehameha relevance to today’s health care issues are what persuaded me. Both are very deserving,

  58. Bill Ericson's Gravatar Bill Ericson
    March 13, 2015 - 11:05 am | Permalink

    I am in awe of both men (have to exclude Emma) as they tried to live live Christ like lives. My vote is for David (not a forced conversion) because the church of his day forget, neglected & ignored his ministry. He should have been ordained to the priesthood but was not & to his credit never gave up on his mission to his people.

  59. MusicResonator's Gravatar MusicResonator
    March 13, 2015 - 11:06 am | Permalink

    Fwiw, this paragraph needs a closer look and perhaps some editing:

    On the home front, Kamehameha and Emma had a son, Albert who died in 1863. It is told that Kamehameha felt responsible for the death of Prince Albert. The four-year-old prince was seriously ill, burning with fever, possibly with spinal meningitis. Kamehameha gave the boy a cold shower to cool him off. However, Albert’s health deteriorated, and the youngster died in August 1862.

    • helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
      March 13, 2015 - 11:30 am | Permalink

      The son, Albert died in 1862, and the King died in 1863.

  60. Elaine Culver's Gravatar Elaine Culver
    March 13, 2015 - 11:07 am | Permalink

    The toughest vote yet for me. I almost had to flip a coin. I decided on King Kamehameha because of his statement, “the sick are our brothers and sisters.” Thanks be to God for both saints in today’s round, and all honor to both.

  61. Brian Perkins's Gravatar Brian Perkins
    March 13, 2015 - 11:08 am | Permalink

    What wonderful examples of service, and despite so much sadness. It’s like reading a lesson in staying power.

  62. linda m.'s Gravatar linda m.
    March 13, 2015 - 11:10 am | Permalink

    for the 1st time in my 3-4 years of LM I had a difficult time making a decision. I went with Oakerhater.

  63. Sally M's Gravatar Sally M
    March 13, 2015 - 11:11 am | Permalink

    These two Saints have been among my favorites for years! I wish both could win. However, David Oakerhater must get my and my husband’s vote in this most difficult matchup. Our children can claim 1/32 Native American ancestry and our Oklahoma roots run deep. But that’s not the reason I love David Oakerhater so much…his life was “transfigured” in a dramatic way because of God’s working all things for good. And in his life he was God’s messenger to his people to change so many others’ lives.

  64. Sister Lynn Julian, CT's Gravatar Sister Lynn Julian, CT
    March 13, 2015 - 11:24 am | Permalink

    This was the hardest yet. I had voted for both in the first round, and this time I leaned toward Kamehaha at first because our Order, the Community of the Transfiguration, had a relationship with him and more particularly Queen Emma We had charge of St. Andrew’s Priory for a time after the English Sisters left, and had Sisters living in Honolulu for some time. However, I felt that David Oakerhater was so important for the Episcopal presence among the Native Americans. I finally voted for Oakerhater especially for the reasons mentioned by Fiona Haworth in her comment above, and for the record he left us in his artwork. What a hard decision!

  65. Diane Norton's Gravatar Diane Norton
    March 13, 2015 - 11:25 am | Permalink

    Island versus mainland, both of these saints, the people they helped, the legacy they left still blessing future generations, saintly in that, are getting more of the attention they deserve as our history books are being rewritten. I too appreciate, and share, the belief that the sick are our bothers and sisters. Thus Elaine’s comment tempted me to switch. But I stayed the course. My vote went to Deacon David Pendleton Oakerhater. He won my heart.

  66. Megan's Gravatar Megan
    March 13, 2015 - 11:25 am | Permalink

    Both of these saints got my vote in the first round. I’ve been dreading this round, knowing that one of them would have to lose. In the end, I had to go with David Oakerhater, because I’ve known him for longer and love the work he did for his people throughout his life.

  67. Ann's Gravatar Ann
    March 13, 2015 - 11:33 am | Permalink

    Yes, remembering that a vote for Kamehameha IV is a vote for Emma, he gets my vote. Emma was the true power behind the throne, but the king was wise enough to listen! I like the thought 0f Kamehameha & Emma embracing the holiness of wholeness–in body (establishing the hospital), mind (the school) and spirit (St Andrew’s Cathedral). And isn’t it wonderful that all three institutions are still thriving today.

    • helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
      March 13, 2015 - 11:51 am | Permalink

      Very well written, thank you, Ann.

  68. Miss J's Gravatar Miss J
    March 13, 2015 - 11:33 am | Permalink

    I voted for both the King & the Deacon on the last round. It is a hard choice between these two indiginous leaders, but I’m voting for the lesser known deacon.

    Also, someone said David had Christianity forced upon him. Where is the evidence for that? Could he have not chosen to follow Christ as his Captain of his own free will? I should hope that true faith freely given is among the requirements before being ordained to the Deaconate in any era!

    • Patricia's Gravatar Patricia
      March 13, 2015 - 2:18 pm | Permalink

      Right, one would think that if Christianity was forced upon David he would not have spent much of his life planting Christian missions “often without the support of the Church” nor been “tireless in his ministry, never stopping until his death on August 31, 1931”

  69. Christianne McKee's Gravatar Christianne McKee
    March 13, 2015 - 11:43 am | Permalink

    This is an impossible choice! David Oakerhater has long been one of my favorite saints for his faithfulness in the face of oppression by the American government. But at the same time, I have Kamehameha, and Emma, for the work they did to provide education and healthcare for their people. A flip of the coin decides my vote. Oakerhater it is.

  70. helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
    March 13, 2015 - 11:46 am | Permalink

    Another note on Kamehameha IV. He studied as a teenager in London and Paris and suffered great discrimination every place he travelled in Europe. He was viewed as an ignorant black, and treated as such. Still, he found a deep connection in the Anglican Church, and they were the only church invited to the islands, as the Anglicans allowed the Hawaiian to retain their customs and culture. His complete translation of the Prayer Book into Hawaiian was quite an accomplishment, but he wanted his people to have their Common Book of Prayer in their own language. The establishment of education for girls was important to the King and Queen.

  71. joan's Gravatar joan
    March 13, 2015 - 11:59 am | Permalink

    Kamehameha wins my vote…he truly embodied 1 John 3:17-18.

  72. Karen's Gravatar Karen
    March 13, 2015 - 12:04 pm | Permalink

    I was amazed by how much Kamehameha and Emma accomplished to improve the health of the Hawaiian people. When I found out that the did all this in only eight years, my vote was sealed. Kamehameha and Emma for the Golden Halo!

  73. Kim on the Bayou's Gravatar Kim on the Bayou
    March 13, 2015 - 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Oakerhater demonstrated the triumph of the human spirit, surviving military defeat and imprisonment and then devoting the rest of his life to providing Native Americans with opportunities for education and spiritual growth.

    Kamehameha created a hospital, school, and churches that have stood the test of time: they are still serving Hawaiians today.

    I chose to vote for the king today. His used his advantages to make lasting contributions.

  74. Marian's Gravatar Marian
    March 13, 2015 - 12:18 pm | Permalink

    I voted for Kamehameha because he vaccinated!

  75. Ann's Gravatar Ann
    March 13, 2015 - 1:08 pm | Permalink

    Kamehameha is also Native American.

  76. Rich's Gravatar Rich
    March 13, 2015 - 1:10 pm | Permalink

    The question of the powerful who chose to use their power wisely, or the poor and cast away who rose above circumstance to bring hope and spiritual leadership despite all obstacles – this is a tough one in that both men took the paths they did. Have to go with Deacon Oakenhater because it a king has the command authority, where God created a path for the Deacon that was much harder to travel, but he prevailed.

  77. teopa's Gravatar teopa
    March 13, 2015 - 1:12 pm | Permalink

    Being totally torn between the two, and not wanting to do the coin toss thing, i went truly shallow and voted for the king, because, Hawaii.

  78. March 13, 2015 - 1:27 pm | Permalink

    In the first round, I voted for Kamehameha in the first round, but this time I was moved more by David’s moving his people from war to peace through Jesus Christ. Perhaps a few leaders in the radical Muslim Sects see the light of Mohammed, rather than the sword as David saw Jesus.

  79. Peg S.'s Gravatar Peg S.
    March 13, 2015 - 1:33 pm | Permalink

    Good Queen Emma’s spouse looked out
    for each dear Hawaiian.
    Oakerhater’s good, no doubt.
    This choice leaves one cryin’.
    Vaccination? Artistry?
    Neither chose to lay low.
    Seems to me it’s clear to see
    Each has earned his haaaalo.

    • Bonnee's Gravatar Bonnee
      March 13, 2015 - 1:54 pm | Permalink

      Wonderful.

    • Harlie Youngblood's Gravatar Harlie Youngblood
      March 14, 2015 - 10:56 am | Permalink

      Sweet!

  80. Marion Jenkins's Gravatar Marion Jenkins
    March 13, 2015 - 1:56 pm | Permalink

    Dear SEC,
    I think it is morally wrong and a sin of great magnitude (though not a mortal sin) to pit two indigenous saints against each other. There are few enough indigenous saints as it is to not give both a chance against the opposition. Shame, Shame. Perhaps the Archbishops may have something to say about this egregious error.

  81. Sherryl's Gravatar Sherryl
    March 13, 2015 - 2:05 pm | Permalink

    I voted for Kamehameha because I believe in that ‘inner light’ principle.
    That is God working through us and Kamehameha had this light from a very early age. He became king at 21…think of that. I was just thinking about myself then, not looking for ways to help in healthcare. Also, Kamehameha had the wisdom to marry another Saint – Queen Emma. Died at 29 but what he did in those few years is amazing.

  82. Donald Lowery's Gravatar Donald Lowery
    March 13, 2015 - 2:20 pm | Permalink

    Was it really necessary to make the choices so hard? Either way, an indigenous person from part of what is now the United States will be honored as model of Christian life and virtue.
    I did vote Kamehameha, but it was a very hard decision.

  83. March 13, 2015 - 2:48 pm | Permalink

    I’m voting for Kamehameha. Providing health care, education, and a tolerant form of Christianity that did not try to abolish native culture are huge accomplishments. Translating the Book of Common Prayer into Hawaiian is huge too. It meant that his people could pray in their first language, and helped to prevent the death of Hawaiian language and culture. It makes me proud to be Episcopal to hear that our church didn’t try to eradicate the “heathen” ways of the Hawaiians. (Well, aside from trying to convince women to wear neck to ankle cotton dresses, I hear).

  84. Carol Riddick's Gravatar Carol Riddick
    March 13, 2015 - 3:05 pm | Permalink

    Perhaps I should read the comments before voting. So many aspects are presented about each of the candidates that I had not thought o,f I go away sometimes thinking my vote should have gone another way. I felt bad that in the first round I did not vote for King Kamehameha for this very reason. I voted for him today because I believe he did so much for his people on so many levels. And while I am an artist with wide humanitarian interests, and find Oakenhater an honorable candidate, I voted for Kamehameha this time.

  85. Sandy's Gravatar Sandy
    March 13, 2015 - 3:20 pm | Permalink

    This has been the most impossible choice for me yet – both are wonderful examples of what it means to be truly Christian. I almost had to resort to checking totals and voting for the underdog, but then I remembered how inspiring it was to learn about David Oakenhater, (I’d never even heard of him until reading his bio in the first round), so I’m making a real decision and voting for him. I liked Michael’s comment that David’s many accomplishments were from a position of weakness.

  86. Donna Devlin's Gravatar Donna Devlin
    March 13, 2015 - 3:26 pm | Permalink

    Every time I read a comment that the person was going to or had voted for the “underdog” I have to wonder just why that is. If that is the usual voting method, it’s no wonder Congress is made up as it is.

  87. March 13, 2015 - 4:52 pm | Permalink

    Come on, Kamehameha!!

  88. Ellen Gracie's Gravatar Ellen Gracie
    March 13, 2015 - 5:00 pm | Permalink

    I have to vote for the deacon! Both men are inspiring and it’s a really hard vote today.

  89. Carol Virginia's Gravatar Carol Virginia
    March 13, 2015 - 5:18 pm | Permalink

    I truly love how seriously we take our opportunity to vote. Sometimes it is with very light hearts, and sometimes with rather heavy ones. I find it difficult to imagine the heavy heart of a wonderful selfless and caring Leader/Servant/King such as Kamehamaha upon the loss of his four year old son. He didn’t deserve such, but Sainthood he does fully deserve.

  90. Dennis james's Gravatar Dennis james
    March 13, 2015 - 6:47 pm | Permalink

    As many others have mentioned, I too voted for both of these saintly men in the first round. I have been discerning all day as to who would earn my vote in the Saintly Sixteen. I love the islands of Hawaii and am deeply impressed by the ministry and mercy of King Kamehameha among the people he led; offering them the gift of the Anglican ethos lived within their own native culture. I was equally impressed with the work of Deacon Oakenhater and his love and commitment to the native peoples of his tribe – I am humbled and comforted by the fact that I can faithfully support either saint in the Elite Eight!

  91. Lee Greenawalt's Gravatar Lee Greenawalt
    March 13, 2015 - 8:10 pm | Permalink

    The conversion of Oakenhater is inspiring, but being converted by defeat and prison is not as unusual as being saintly from a position of privilege.

  92. Michelle's Gravatar Michelle
    March 13, 2015 - 8:34 pm | Permalink

    Wow, the disdain for the arts that appears in the comments today really distresses me. David Oakerhater used his art to recover from the trauma of displacement, defeat, and imprisonment by an invading force. That he was able to rise up from this oppression and commit to the service of Christ and his community is extraordinarily impressive and I suggest strongly influenced by his practice of art. Art therapists make use of these techniques when working with PTSD victims to this day. Art preps the mind to respond to new perspectives; surely new life in Christ qualifies!

    • March 13, 2015 - 8:42 pm | Permalink

      Hmmm. “Disdain for the arts”? In what way? I’ve read all the comments and do not read disdain in any of them. Am I missing something here? Or do you view a vote for the King as disdain for art?

      • Donna Devlin's Gravatar Donna Devlin
        March 13, 2015 - 9:13 pm | Permalink

        A vote for the King is not disdainful of the arts but the comments that basically said ,”Oh golly gee, he painted a few pretty pictures. Wow, what’s to get excited about that?” That’s the disdainful part.

    • Donna Devlin's Gravatar Donna Devlin
      March 13, 2015 - 9:10 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for your wonderful words. They were sorely needed.

  93. Barbara Gay's Gravatar Barbara Gay
    March 13, 2015 - 10:51 pm | Permalink

    “There is something wholesome in being called upon from time to time to acknowledge, however strong our own health may be, and however prosperous our fortunes, that after all, the sick are our brothers and sisters.” Wish opponents of health care reform would understand this reality. Had to go with the guy who said it.

  94. Bindy Snyder's Gravatar Bindy Snyder
    March 13, 2015 - 11:08 pm | Permalink

    When is the saintly kitsch competition?

  95. Robert Coates's Gravatar Robert Coates
    March 13, 2015 - 11:14 pm | Permalink

    The only race of people in the United States treated more shamefully than the Native Americans is the Hawaiians. The means by which we acquired Hawaii were so shameful that Grover Cleveland tried to give it back. The Hawaiian Royal Family were characterized by grace, nobility and passionate devotion to their people. We have had no heads of state to compare with them. King Kamehameha and Queen Emma are true Royal Saints.

  96. Nancy Muhlheim's Gravatar Nancy Muhlheim
    March 14, 2015 - 5:10 pm | Permalink

    Growing up in Hawaii, all I ever heard about Kamehameha was what a great Warrior he was. Not humanitarian…Warrior. The “Wailuku River” (Maui) ran red with blood after one of his conquests. There are many stories of his courage and leadership…..but I had never heard any about his kindness until now. From a friend who grew up in Hilo, Hawaii

    • Ann's Gravatar Ann
      March 14, 2015 - 8:48 pm | Permalink

      Our Kamehameha is Kamehameha IV, not the warrior!!

      • helene from Middletown, Ohio's Gravatar helene from Middletown, Ohio
        March 14, 2015 - 9:38 pm | Permalink

        Exactly, Ann, this is Kamehameha IV. There were 5 Kamehamehas.

Comments are closed.